For Readers

“I didn’t know how strong I was until I was totally lost.

I love kickass heroines like Katniss Everdeen, Black Widow, and even self-absorbed Scarlett O’Hara. So I just didn’t get why when I began writing my series, A Girl Called Fearless, that this voice inside me insisted that my heroine had to be someone who wasn’t a super hero or an expert assassin or divergent.

I made Avie an ordinary teenage girl facing an almost impossible crisis…She comes home from school to find that her dad has sold her into marriage as part of a business deal to save his failing company. Avie has to choose between marrying a man twice her age, or making a dangerous run for freedom in Canada. Avie is scared as hell. She doesn’t see herself as fearless, despite the fact that her lifelong friend Yates calls her that.

Avie goes on the run, and is chased, tracked down, and shot at. To survive, Avie has to make deals with skeezy characters, and survive face offs with ruthless politicians. By the end of A Girl Undone, Avie has become truly kickass.

It wasn’t until after I wrote the ending, that I realized why I was absolutely compelled to write about a girl who didn’t start out seeing herself as anything special. I had to write about Avie, because her story was my story.

I had just lived through a truly hideous time. My family was in crisis, and for four years, I got up every day, not knowing how to help them, but trying everything I could think of. There were so many days when I failed, and I’d sit in my car in the garage and cry, because I didn’t know how much longer I could take it. But slowly things got better, and one day I realized, I’d made it. I survived.

I guess I needed readers to know they are not alone. We look around us, and see people who appear braver or stronger or more talented than we are, but the truth is that we don’t realize just how strong we are until we have to face the worst. We try and fail and try again, because inside all of us, is a kickass heroine waiting to be born.”

From: Teenreads.com 

Reading group guides for both books can be downloaded here:

Catherine Linka black and white photo

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